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20121224
20130101
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KQED (PBS) 8
KRCB (PBS) 6
KQEH (PBS) 5
CSPAN 2
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English 24
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Dec 23, 2012 9:00pm PST
the building of a religion. in the first two parts, with the help of scholars and historians, we tried to reconstruct his times, and how, after his death, a small jewish sect began to spread the word. tonight, how that story was told, and how a faith overcame an empire. ( music playing ) >> narrator: jewish resistance was not completely snuffed out after the sack of jerusalem. rebel fighters held out for four more years. the jewish historian josephus, who had taken part in the war, recounted the story: >> there was a fortress of very great strength not far from jerusalem which had been built by our ancient kings. it is called masada. >> the rock of masada, one of the most glorious places in all israel, became the major refuge point for some of the most extremist elements opposing rome. the zealots, and their most ardent supporters, fled right in the middle of the war to masada. >> ( dramatized ): here had been stored a mass of corn amply sufficient to last for years, an abundance of wine and oil. there was also found a mass of arms of every description hoarded up by the king and suffic
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 8:15pm EST
somehow or other with the issue of religion and the life of politics and social life. this is including the book, difficulty journalists frequently have and probably understanding religion as a motive in offense. is called blind spot, done together with her birder amundsen and my colleague who is here today, coal martial. it was published and won several literary prizes. it has also included work on a book entitled a table in the presence which was written by lieutenant commander carry cash which concerns his experiences as a chaplain in combat. another portion of her work also within the area of religion has focused on the fate of christians around the world and in particular their travails in recent years. this included award-winning their blood cries out co-authored with marshall and the award-winning biography by baroness cox, eyewitness to a world. erinys cox is a distinguished member of the house of lords, famous as a campaigner for human rights and for christian rights. there will also be fairly soon another book called persecuted, the global assault on christians which will be o
PBS
Dec 24, 2012 5:30pm PST
, very polarizing charter, defines a lot of the basic human value like treatment woman of religion,reedom of expression, so i'm not sure that ts is the way forward. however, we would have to take it from there and i think that we treat that constitution try to get another assembly to work, that is not polarizing but establish a consensus among the two divided fraction of the society. right now we have educated middle class on one camp and the so-called lamists and majority of the illiterate part on the other side. that's not the way we expected after the uprising. we need a charter that unifies people that not talking about controversial issues like role, freedom of expression, freedom of religion, freedom of worship but talk about science, technology, health care, that is what people compare about. we are going through difficult time that the economy is falling apa, standard andoor downgraded us to a d minus. not in the greatest shape. we need to see a way to move forward. but it is difficult time right now. >> ifill: but if these numbers hold, it looks like pretty significant vi
PBS
Dec 24, 2012 4:00pm PST
of the basic values, like freedom of expression, religion, so we are going to fight it, and one of our first platforms will be to abolish or of the very least amend the constitution. -- or at the very least abolished -- amend the constitution. >> they expect the crisis to end soon. >> it is not against the regime. that is very bad for the country -- country. we are losing almost 50 million american dollars a day, and the egyptian government is not strong enough. >> many egyptians are tired of the political upheaval. looking to bring civility. others are afraid the country could be moving towards an islamic state. egypt is deeply divided about its future. bbc news, cairo. >> the former president of south africa, nelson mandela, is said to be spending christmas in the hospital. he was admitted two weeks ago because of a lung infection, but while in the hospital, he was also treated for gallstones, and doctors say he is not quite ready to be allowed home. we resent this update from johannesburg. >> nelson mandela was admitted to the hospital, and now, it appears he will not be discharged in tim
PBS
Dec 25, 2012 4:00pm PST
people, as he put it, to build a more fraternal society, allowing religions to make their contribution. the vatican's relations with beijing reached a new low earlier this year with the detention by chinese authorities of a new roman catholic bishop of shanghai, which had previously than approved. he gave his blessing in 65 languages. [cheers and applause] >> although he sometimes walks with a stick and is tushed on a traveling platform to save his strength when he fish yates at masses, pope benedict wears his 85 years relatively well. at times his voice may be slightly hoarse, but his determination to continue in office is unshaken by increasing age. "bbc news," rome. >> at least 27 people have been killed in a plane vash in southern kazakhstan. it was considering -- carrying several people. they said the plane had up and only fragments remains. it came down close to the city of shymkent. >> a plane has crash landed on a road in burma. two died and 11 were injured when the aircraft came down three kilometers short of its intended destination. here is our report. >> a burned-out shell
PBS
Dec 26, 2012 5:30pm PST
freedom of religion, freedom of expression, independence of the judiciary. so i'm not sure that this is the way forward. one of the most dangerous parts in that constitution, that it opened the door for many controversial school of religious thoughts to seep through the legislative process and undermine the authority of the judiciary. >> warner: the constitution was approved by 64% of the national vote, but only a third of eligible voters had turned out. and in major cities like cairo, majorities voted "no." this morning, those divisions were still apparent in cairo. >> ( translated ): it will certainly lead to stability. we can now begin to move forward. investment can begin to come into egypt. what more do people want? >> ( translated ): we are very sad and we never wanted the situation to be this way. we never wanted just one political group to rule. we wanted there to be uity. >> warner: for now, legislative power rests with the country's upper house of parliament, which is dominated by islamists. it was seated today. >> ( translated ): with regards >> warner: parliamen
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 5:00pm EST
many ethnicities, nationalities, religions, and yet we are bound together as one people because of our allegiance and our respect and our reverence for the constitution, and this is a link, a tie, a bond to our history and to our heritage. that is unique or almost unique in the world. this tie that we have to our constitution that defines us gives us stability and a purpose and a mission to our people. and it is the envy of the rest of the world. the british revere their constitution as well. not quite the same. william gladstone, prime minister of england, at one time talked -- compared the american and thening lish -- the english constitution. he began by saying the english constitution was grown, the american substitution was something that was made. if you ended there, you might have thought it was rather patronizing, the english constitution was made and the american constitution, made. he went on to refer to the american constitution in the most laudatory an complementary of terms. he said in that same statement, just as the british constitution is the most shuttle organism ever
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 12:00pm EST
their religion. in fact, restrictions on baha'is extend far beyond their religious practices to further restrict their civil rights and their human rights. many members of the baha'i faith living in iran are even subject to harassment, to persecution by the regime and others with extensive reports of confiscation of property, restrictions on travel and raids on baha'i homes and businesses. the iranian government continues to arrest and detain baha'is based on their religious beliefs with at least 60 cases logged last year alone. the members of the national leadership of baha'is in iran arrested in 2008 and unfairly tried with minimal access to their defense attorneys are now serving a 20-year sentence for crimes, crimes including insulting religious sanctity and propaganda against the regime. the government maintains possession of many baha'i properties that were seized following the 1979 revolution, including holy places, cemeteries and historical sites. many of those properties have now been destroyed. baha'is are barred from leadership positions in the government and are only permits to enrol
PBS
Dec 28, 2012 5:30pm PST
, i think the sense of powerlessness on women in india is something that goes across cast and religion t is widespread. there is frustration about it. as julie said there is a deep vein of frustration in the country. and i think that is what we are seeing,this thisne case asparked off, you know, this citizen's protest didn't come out of nowhere. it's not a new issue. there have been sexual violence against women in india for many, many decades. but i think the sense ever a new feeling of kind of liberation about being able to take to the streets and say something about it is why we are seeing so much action right now. >> when a woman overcomes her own misgivings, pressure from her own family, and actually goes to the police, what happens? are the accusations investigated? are the accused tied? >> well this is one of the bigger problems, ray. because first of all it has to be said that the vast majority of the rapes are not reported in india as all over the world. but especially in india because it is a huge that would. there is a cultural no-no against it. it can ruin your life, if are
FOX Business
Dec 26, 2012 11:00am EST
down in fall of 2008. shibani: that was huge. several hundred points. >> that will get some religion in to politicians in washington and they will get their act together and make a resolution. certainty is what we are looking for. not that we need the fiscal cliff result one way or the other but we need certainty. we need policy in place so people and corporations know how to spend money. dennis: certainty promised is pretty bleak. two million more job losses, the nation would go into recession again. doesn't have to be the end of the world that politicians want to avoid. widened to of view say we're going over the cliff, there's a chance they get this thing done? [talking over each other] shibani: no one is doing any work today. >> things can happen. we have seen things happen on a short time from. i was amazed when i woke up this morning checking news feeds that everyone was enthusiastic about the deal coming together. absolutely nothing from an evidence point of view would support that between today and three days ago but you are right that things do happen on a short time frame.
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)